SNAP: ABAWD Exemptions

Younger than 18 or 50 years of age and older

Client’s statement of birthdate is sufficient. The IMS system will check the date with Social Security Administration (SSA). A data exchange error will occur if SSA has a different birthdate.
See Frequently Asked Questions

Determined by the agency to be medically certified as physically or mentally unfit for employment / homeless.

Being homeless in and of itself is not an exemption. The person must be unfit for employment due to his or her homelessness. Examples may include not having a place to take a shower, wash clothes, or get ready for work.
See Frequently Asked Questions

Children in Household Exemption – Living with Minor Children

All adults, age 18 to 50, who are included in the SNAP household with a child under age 18, are exempt. No requirement to be “caretaker”.
See Frequently Asked Questions

Pregnant

There is no extent of pregnancy required. Need verification of pregnancy unless worker can physically see.
See Frequently Asked Questions

Otherwise Exempt from Work Registration

Refer to article SNAP: Work Registrant Exemptions

EXEMPTIONS FAQ’S

Younger than 18 or 50 years of age and older

Q1. A client’s 17 year old child turns 18 on March 15th. When does the age exemption end for this child?

The birthday month of March is an exempt month. It doesn’t matter when the birthday date occurs, ABAWD work requirement determination begins the month following the birthday month or April.

Q2. A client turns age 50 on March 15th. When does this person become ABAWD exempt?

A person that turns 50 at any point during the birthday month becomes exempt during that month. It doesn’t matter when the birthday date is, the person is exempt beginning the birthday month.

Determined by the agency to be medically certified as physically or mentally unfit for employment / chronically homeless.

Q1. Kevin is currently living in an abandoned building after being evicted from his apartment 3 months ago. He states that he has no regular access to a shower or laundry facilities, and only owns a couple sets of clothes. Can Kevin be exempt from ABAWD because of homelessness?

Yes. In Kevin’s case, he can be exempt from ABAWD under the medically certified as physically or mentally unfit for employment / homeless category because he is considered chronically homeless.

Q2. Rick, age 42, works 15 hours a week, at an employment placement agency. He is considered to be 50% disabled from the VA. Can Rick be exempt from ABAWD under the medically certified as physically or mentally unfit for employment category?

Yes. Any individual that is considered to be disabled from the VA can be exempt from ABAWD under the medically or mentally unfit for employment category no matter the percentage of disability.

Children in Household Exemption-Living with Minor Children

Q1. Divorced parents of a child both receive SNAP benefits for their own household. Mom includes the child in her SNAP household. The child stays with Dad every other weekend. Can Dad be exempt because his child resides in his household every other weekend?

No. Dad can only be exempt if the child is included in his SNAP household.

Q2. A client lives with his sister and her children. He declares separate household status from his sister and receives SNAP benefits for himself only. Can he be exempt because he resides in the same household (under one roof) with children under age 18?

No. He cannot use this exemption because the children are not included in his SNAP household.

Q3. Same household situation as #2, however, the client, his sister and her children are one SNAP household. Can he be exempted because he lives in the home with children under age 18?

Yes. The children, under age 18, are included in the SNAP household

Q4. SNAP household consists of a 19 year old man, his 16 year old wife and his parents, both under age 50. Can the 19 year old and his parents be exempt because they reside in the home with a 16 year old (wife/daughter-in-law)?

Yes. Marriage is not a factor with this exemption. When there is a person under age 18, all adults in the SNAP household can be exempt.

Q5. A SNAP client watches her next door neighbor’s two children, ages 6 and 7, after school until their Mom gets home from work. Can the client be exempt because she provides after-school care for the two neighbor children?

No. The neighbor’s children are not included in her SNAP household.

Q6. A SNAP client receives benefits for himself only and watches his young grandchildren in his own home when their babysitter can’t watch them. Can he continue to be exempt as caretaker for his grandchildren?

No. The grandchildren are not included in the client’s SNAP household. NOTE: The grandchildren would not be allowed to be added to the SNAP household as they are visitors to the home.

Q7. Can both a mother and father be exempt if they just have one child?

Yes. Caretaker status no longer applies to this particular exemption. The exemption is redefined to state ‘children in household exemption – living with a minor child’. When there is a person under age 18 living in the SNAP household, all adults in the SNAP household are exempt.

Q8. We have clients whose children are currently in state custody. The foster parents receive SNAP food benefits and have included the foster children in their SNAP household. The children have planned visitations with their biological parents each month. The biological parents are also receiving SNAP food benefits. Can the biological parents be exempt because their children have planned visitation stays in their home each month?

No. The biological parents do not have their children included in their SNAP household. They cannot be exempt just because their children have planned visitations in their home each month. They must also be included in their biological parents’ SNAP household.

Pregnancy

Q1. How pregnant must a person be to be exempt?

There is no time requirement.

Miscellaneous

Q1. If client meets multiple exemptions, which do we use?

The choice is up to the worker when more than one exemption can be used. It’s recommended case notes be updated explaining there’s more than one exemption that applies and indicate which exemption was used.

Q2. My client is currently coded “K” and certified for three full months. The client contacted me to report he has started work. He has also provided a statement from the employer which gives an estimate of the number of hours per week he works and his hourly pay rate. Based on this estimate, the client will be over income for SNAP. Do I need to wait until the client has received at least his first full paycheck before closing the SNAP benefits (like we would for a benefit reporting household)?

Yes, in this example, there is no difference between the action you would take for a benefit reporting household and a non-reporter household. The client must provide us with a copy of at least his/her first full paycheck before we can close the SNAP benefits.

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