Child Care Subsidy: Household Examples & Coding

The following are examples of different types of child care households. In these examples we will determine whether or not the household member’s income is countable and whether or not he or she must meet a need factor.

Example 1

Patti visits the DHS office to apply for child care for her 7 year old daughter, Trisha. Patti does not get off work until 5:30 p.m. Patti’s 18 year old daughter Reba is a student at the local community college, and works part-time at the mall. Patti requests child care for Trisha for after school.
  • Since Patti is the parent, we must count any income, earned or unearned, that she receives. Patti has to meet an allowable need factor, and Patti fulfills this requirement by working. Patti is coded K/O, Income and Resources Considered, Individual Considered.
  • Any income Trisha receives, such as child support or survivor benefits, is countable for child care benefits. Trisha is coded K/A, Added to Benefits.
  • Reba’s income is not countable and she does not have to meet a need factor as adult siblings 18 years of age or older are not included in the child care household. Reba is coded K/R as she is 18 and not a part of the Child Care household.

Example 2

Samuel visits the DHS office to request child care for his 3 year old grandson Jacob. Jacob’s parents left him at Samuel’s house last weekend and he has not heard from them since. Samuel took a few days off work to watch Jacob, but he is close to exhausting his leave time. Jacob also has a 16 year old brother Paul, who lives with Samuel. Paul is currently attending high school and works part-time at the football games in the concession stand. There are no court documents regarding custody of Paul or Jacob.
  • Samuel’s income from employment is not countable because he is not “legally and financially” responsible for Jacob. Samuel must meet an allowable need factor for child care benefits. He meets this need factor by working. Samuel is coded K/N, Income and Resources Not Considered / Individual Not Included as he is not legally and financially responsible for the children.
  • If Jacob or Paul receives any unearned income such as child support, it is countable for child care benefits. Jacob is coded as K/A, Added to Benefits.
  • Any earned income received by Paul is not countable because he is attending school. Paul’s earned income would count if he was not attending school. Paul is coded K/O, Income and Resources Considered/Individual Included as he is Jacob’s minor brother. Since Paul is a student, his employment income is not considered for eligibility.

Example 3

Gretchen requests child care for her three sons: Max age 1, Robby age 4, and Tim age 6. Gretchen was recently hired at a local telemarketing office. Gretchen’s boyfriend, Brady also resides in the home and is the father of Max. Brady is self-employed and owns his own lawn care business. Brady is meeting the minimum wage rule for child care.
  • Any earned or unearned income that Gretchen receives is countable income. Gretchen must meet an allowable need factor, which is employment in this example. Gretchen is coded K/O, Income and Resources Considered / Individual Included.
  • All income received for Max, Robby, and Tim is countable for child care benefits. Max, Robby, and Tim are coded K/A, Added to Benefits.
  • Any income from Brady’s self-employment is countable even though he and Gretchen are not married because Brady is the father of Max. Brady must meet a need factor. Brady is coded K/O, Income and Resources Considered / Individual Included.

Example 4

Shonna requests child care for her 4 month old granddaughter, Mariah, while she works. Shonna obtained legal guardianship of Mariah when her daughter, Amanda, was in rehab. Amanda, who is 17, has moved back into the home and is not meeting a need factor.
Shonna cannot apply for child care for Mariah. Since Amanda is still in the home, she must apply for child care benefits on her own when she meets a need factor. Shonna would be coded K/R, Removed from Benefits (if she is listed on the case) as she is not a part of the child care household. Amanda is coded K/O, Income and Resources Considered / Individual Included. Mariah is coded K/A, Added to Benefits.

Example 5

LaDonna applies for child care for 3 year old Joe while she works. LaDonna is not related to Joe. Several days ago, Joe’s mother, Nancy, asked LaDonna to babysit Joe while she went to the store. Nancy did not return. LaDonna has tried to contact Nancy, but Nancy’s number has been disconnected and LaDonna heard from mutual friends that Nancy moved to Texas because there was a warrant out for her arrest in Oklahoma.

  • Even though there is no blood relationship between Joe and LaDonna, she may still qualify for child care as she is now Joe’s caretaker. Her income from employment will not be countable as she is not legally or financially responsible for Joe. LaDonna must still meet a need factor, which she does by working. LaDonna is coded K/N, Income and Resources Not Considered / Individual Not Included.
  • If Joe has any income, this will be countable. Joe is coded K/A, Added to Benefits.
  • It may be advised that LaDonna contact Child Welfare for additional resources.

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